What do you do to relax?

Work with church and school activities my elementary, high school and college classes for reunions.

Other MSCA patients dealing with MS every day, just the way Gloria Manson does, tell her she is an inspiration to them. Her testament of faith in her journey and her positive outlook in the midst of her struggles help those around her find strength and courage.

When were you diagnosed with MS?

After four grueling years of strange body malfunctions, such as falls, speech, seeing, difficulties in dressing to go to work, inability to complete my exercising classes in school, I was diagnosed in 1984 with MS.

How did your diagnosis change your life?

MS changed my life totally. I have always been an outgoing person, involved with church and community activities. After my diagnosis, my involvement with these activities was tremendously reduced. My loss of coordination, vision difficulties and fatigue contributed to my inability to drive and severely limited my activities. Even though I was forced to require the assistance of others to sustain my life, I never gave up.

What is your key to living successfully with MS?

The blessings of God, which include the care by Drs. William and Douglas Stuart, and the love and concern of family, specifically for me the love and care of my sister and the prayers of my mother. I had a professor with whom I worked with at the Morehouse School of Medicine who told me to never say what I used to do, because that person no longer existed. Just go forward the best I could.

What is your biggest piece of advice to anyone struggling with MS?

Trust God and pray. Learn as much as possible about the disease, listen to and follow your doctor’s advice. I know for a fact that all the doctors and staff at the MS Center I have come in contact with truly care about you.

What is your key to living successfully with MS?

The blessings of God, which include the care by Drs. William and Douglas Stuart, and the love and concern of family, specifically for me the love and care of my sister and the prayers of my mother. I had a professor with whom I worked with at the Morehouse School of Medicine who told me to never say what I used to do, because that person no longer existed. Just go forward the best I could.

What do you think is unique and remarkable about MSCA?

I have attended the Center since its inception and have received the best of care. It has always been a caring Center that feels like family.

Is there anything else you would like to share about your experience with MS?

I was paralyzed for 10 years. On December 8, 2004, I was awakened by a light in my room. Initially, I thought someone had left the light on in my room, but the light kept coming toward me. I heard a voice instructing me to get up. I hesitated because I knew I could not walk. I was told to get up anyway, and that I did not have to understand it, just do what He said. Just because He said so! Then I wiggled my way to my bedside commode, leaned over to grab my wheelchair to pull myself up, and I was engulfed by a blue and white cloud. It felt like something was pushing me and pulling me simultaneously. I walked over to the light, realizing that Jesus was the light of the world. Yes, Jesus visited me after all the problematic years with MS, and in His time restored the use of my legs! I have been walking ever since.

On my next MSCA visit, Dr. Stuart and several nurses who had attended me over the years were taken aback that I was walking. I still have MS and its problems and I still visit the clinic monthly, but I am walking among the other patients as a testament of His goodness, to evangelize, to give hope to those who have given up. I almost did. Patients who knew me when I was in the wheelchair with this debilitating and incurable disease tell me their faith has been restored. I tell as many persons as possible what God did and continues to do.